Every time I drive past Texas Roadhouse on Navarro I see a parking lot full of cars. It's always a great meal and the staff at our local TR is always friendly and ready to take good care of you.

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Probably because they had some great leadership at the top. KENS5.com reports the sad news of the passing of Texas Roadhouse CEO Kent Taylor who has passed away at the age of 65. Taylor was a Louisville native who opened his first Texas Roadhouse in Indiana back in 1993. Have I been enjoying cinnamon-infused butter for that long? I guess I have.

You might remember during 2020, Kent Taylor refused his salary as CEO so that he could give it to his employees who were struggling to make ends meet. In a video from youtube, Texas Roadhouse Board of Directors was quoted as saying, "Kent was without a doubt, a people-first leader. His entrepreneurial spirit will live on in the company he built, the projects he supported, and the lives he touched.” See Kent in action doing what he loved most in the video below.

To date, there are some 630 Texas Roadhouse locations in 49 states and in 10 countries according to WLKY.com. At the time of this publication, there has not been an official cause of death released to the public. Funeral arrangements have also not been released to the public at this time.

I'm gonna need to go have me a steak bbq chicken combo tonight. God's speed, Kent Taylor.

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